Spain national football team

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Spain
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)La Roja ("The Red One")
La Furia Roja ("The Red Fury")
AssociationReal Federación Española de Fútbol (RFEF)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachLuis Enrique
CaptainSergio Busquets
Most capsSergio Ramos (180)
Top scorerDavid Villa (59)
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA codeESP
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 6 Steady (27 May 2021)
Highest1 (July 2008 – June 2009, October 2009 – March 2010, July 2010 – July 2011, October 2011 – July 2014)
Lowest25 (March 1998)
First international
 Spain 1–0 Denmark 
(Brussels, Belgium; 28 August 1920)
Biggest win
 Spain 13–0 Bulgaria 
(Madrid, Spain; 22 August 1933)
Biggest defeat
 Spain 1–7 Italy 
(Amsterdam, Netherlands; 4 June 1928)
 England 7–1 Spain 
(London, England; 9 December 1931)
World Cup
Appearances15 (first in 1934)
Best resultChampions (2010)
European Championship
Appearances11 (first in 1964)
Best resultChampions (1964, 2008, 2012)
Nations League Finals
Appearances1 (first in 2021)
FIFA Confederations Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2009)
Best resultRunners-up (2013)

The Spain national football team (Spanish: Selección Española de Fútbol) represents Spain in international men's football competitions since 1920. It is governed by the Royal Spanish Football Federation, the governing body for football in Spain. Spain are one of the eight national teams to have been crowned world champions, having participated in a total of 15 of 21 FIFA World Cups and qualifying consistently since 1978. Spain also won three continental titles, having appeared at 11 of 15 UEFA European Championships.

Spain is the only national team with three consecutive major titles, becoming the first European team to win a FIFA World Cup outside of Europe in 2010 as well as the only one to win back-to-back European Championships in 2008 and 2012. From 2008 to 2013, Spain won the FIFA Team of the Year, the second-most of any nation, behind only Brazil. Also between February 2007 and June 2009, Spain went undefeated for a record-equalling 35 consecutive matches, shared with Brazil. Their achievements have led many experts and commentators to consider the 2008–2012 Spanish squad one of the best ever international sides in world football.

History

Spain national football team in the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp

Spain has been a member of FIFA since FIFA's foundation in 1904, even though the Spanish Football Federation was first established in 1909. The first Spain national football team was constituted in 1920, with the main objective of finding a team that would represent Spain at the Summer Olympics held in Belgium in that same year. Spain made their debut at the tournament on 28 August 1920 against Denmark, silver medallists at the last two Olympic tournaments. The Spanish managed to win that match by a scoreline of 1–0, eventually finishing with the silver medal. Spain qualified for their first FIFA World Cup in 1934, defeating Brazil in their first game and losing in a replay to the hosts and eventual champions Italy in the quarter-finals. The Spanish Civil War and World War II prevented Spain from playing any competitive matches between the 1934 World Cup and the 1950 edition's qualifiers. At the 1950 finals in Brazil, they topped their group to progress to the final round, then finished in fourth place. Until 2010, this had been Spain's highest finish in a FIFA World Cup finals, which had given them the name of the "underachievers".

Spain won its first major international title when hosting the 1964 European Championship held in Spain, defeating the Soviet Union 2–1 in the final at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium. The victory would stand as Spain's lone major title for 44 years. Spain was selected as host of the 1982 FIFA World Cup, reaching the second round and four years later they reached the quarter-finals before a penalty shootout defeat to Belgium. Spain reached the quarter-finals of the 1994 World Cup. The match became controversial when Italian defender Mauro Tassotti struck Luis Enrique with his elbow inside Spain's penalty area, causing Luis Enrique to bleed profusely from his nose and mouth, but the foul was not noticed nor sanctioned by referee Sándor Puhl. Had the official acknowledged the foul, Spain would have merited a penalty kick. In the 2002 World Cup, Spain won its three group play matches, then defeated the Republic of Ireland on penalties in the second round. They faced co-hosts South Korea in the quarter-finals, losing in a shootout after having two goals controversially called back for alleged infractions during regular and extra time.

World Cup champions parade, celebrate as they pass in front of the Air Force Headquarters in Madrid.

At UEFA Euro 2008, Spain won all their games in Group D. Italy were the opponents in the quarter-final match, which Spain won 4–2 on penalties. They then met Russia again in the semi-final, beating them 3–0. In the final, Spain defeated Germany 1–0, with Fernando Torres scoring the only goal of the game. This was Spain's first major title since the 1964 European Championship. Xavi was awarded the player of the tournament. In the 2010 World Cup, Spain advanced to the final for the first time ever by defeating Germany 1–0. In the decisive match against the Netherlands, Andrés Iniesta scored the match's only goal, coming in extra time. Spain became the third team to win a World Cup outside their own continent, and the first European team to do so. Goalkeeper Iker Casillas won the golden glove for only conceding two goals during the tournament, while David Villa won the bronze ball and silver boot, tied for top scorer of the tournament. Spain qualified top of Group I in qualification for UEFA Euro 2012 with a perfect 100% record. They became the first team to retain the European Championship, winning the final 4–0 against Italy, while Fernando Torres won the Golden Boot for top scorer of the tournament.

Two years later, however, they were eliminated from the group stage of the 2014 World Cup. At Euro 2016 and the 2018 World Cup, the side reached the last 16. In the UEFA Euro 2020 held in 2021, Spain made some breakthrough as the team reached the last four before losing to eventual champions Italy, though with a largely unimpressive performance as Spain had won only one game in regulation time throughout the tournament.


Team image

Nicknames

Spanish team is commonly known by fans as "La Furia Roja", meaning the Red Fury in Spanish. recalling the "Sack of Antwerp" - an episode in the military history of Spain-. However, there are another unofficial nicknames to refer to the national team of Spain.

The other most common nickname, known by fans, is "Los Toros" (Fighting Bulls), since Spanish Fighting Bull is one of Spain's famous national treasures and often used to define Spanish culture, and also often depicted by Spanish supporters alike. Spanish football team is sometimes also referred as the Bulls due to this cultural heritage.

Spanish team also received other nicknames, mostly "Toreros" or "Matador", both meanings are Bullfighters in Spanish, to describe its passionate and romantic style of football playing.

Style of play

Spain, UEFA Euro 2008 winners
Spanish players celebrate winning the 2010 FIFA World Cup
Spain, UEFA Euro 2012 winners

During Spain's most successful period between 2008 and 2012, the team played a style of football dubbed 'tiki-taka', a systems approach to football founded upon the ideal of team unity and a comprehensive understanding in the geometry of space on a football field.

Tiki-taka has been variously described as "a style of play based on making your way to the back of the net through short passing and movement", a "short passing style in which the ball is worked carefully through various channels", and a "nonsensical phrase that has come to mean short passing, patience and possession above all else". The style involves roaming movement and positional interchange amongst midfielders, moving the ball in intricate patterns, and sharp, one or two-touch passing. Tiki-taka is "both defensive and offensive in equal measure" – the team is always in possession, so doesn't need to switch between defending and attacking. Commentators have contrasted tiki-taka with "Route One physicality" and with the higher-tempo passing of Barcelona and Arsène Wenger's 2007–08 Arsenal side, which employed Cesc Fàbregas as the only channel between defence and attack. Tiki-taka is associated with flair, creativity, and touch, but can also be taken to a "slow, directionless extreme" that sacrifices effectiveness for aesthetics.

Tiki-taka was successfully employed by the Spanish national team to win UEFA Euro 2008, 2010 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2012. The team of this era is regarded as being among the greatest international teams in history.

They have the Barcelona "carousel" of Xavi and Andrés Iniesta augmented by Real Madrid's Xabi Alonso in midfield.

— Phil McNulty of the BBC on the midfield players at the heart of Spain's tiki-taka passing style of play.

Sid Lowe identifies Luis Aragonés' tempering of tiki-taka with pragmatism as a key factor in Spain's success in Euro 2008. Aragonés used tiki-taka to "protect a defense that appeared suspect [...], maintain possession and dominate games" without taking the style to "evangelical extremes". None of Spain's first six goals in the tournament came from tiki-taka: five came from direct breaks and one from a set play. For Lowe, Spain's success in the 2010 World Cup was evidence of the meeting of two traditions in Spanish football: the "powerful, aggressive, direct" style that earned the silver medal-winning 1920 Antwerp Olympics team the nickname La Furia Roja ("The Red Fury") and the tiki-taka style of the contemporary Spanish team, which focused on a collective, short-passing, technical and possession-based game.

Analyzing Spain's semi-final victory over Germany at the 2010 World Cup, Honigstein described the Spanish team's tiki-taka style as "the most difficult version of football possible: an uncompromising passing game, coupled with intense, high pressing". For Honigstein, tiki-taka is "a significant upgrade" of Total Football because it relies on ball movement rather than players switching position. Tiki-taka allowed Spain to "control both the ball and the opponent".

We have the same idea as each other. Keep the ball, create movement around and off the ball, get in the spaces to cause danger.

— Xabi Alonso (Spanish midfielder).

Kits and crest

Spain's kit is traditionally a red jersey with yellow trim, dark blue shorts and black socks, whilst their current away kit is all predominantly white. The colour of the socks altered throughout the 1990s from black to the same blue colour as the shorts, matching either the blue of the shorts or the red of the shirt until the mid-2010s when they returned to their traditional black. Spain's kits have been produced by manufacturers including Adidas (from 1981 until 1983), Le Coq Sportif (from 1983 until 1991) and Adidas once again (since 1991). Rather than displaying the logo of the Spanish football federation, Spain's jersey traditionally features the coat of arms of Spain over the left breast. After winning the 2010 World Cup, the World Cup winners badge was added to the right breast of the jersey and a golden star at the top of the Spanish coat of arms.

Kit suppliers

Kit supplier Period Notes
None 1920–1935
Spain Deportes Cóndor 1935–1966
England Umbro 1966
Spain Deportes Cóndor 1967–1981
Germany Adidas 1981–1983
France Le Coq Sportif 1983–1991
Germany Adidas 1991–present Current until 2030

Home stadium

Spain does not have a designated national stadium, and as such, major qualifying matches are usually played at the Santiago Bernabéu Stadium in Madrid. The capital city Madrid (Bernabéu and Metropolitano), Seville (Pizjuán and Villamarín), Valencia (Mestalla and Orriols) and Barcelona (Camp Nou and Montjuïc), are the four Spanish cities that have hosted more than 15 national team matches, while also being home to the largest stadiums in the country.

Other friendly matches, as well as qualifying fixtures against smaller opponents, are played in provincial stadia. The 2018 FIFA World Cup qualification campaign included matches at the Reino de León in León, Los Cármenes in Granada, El Molinón in Gijón, and the Rico Pérez in Alicante.

Media coverage

Spain's UEFA European Qualifiers and UEFA Nations League matches, and all friendly games from 2018 until 2022, will be televised nationwide by La 1, flagship television channel of the public broadcaster TVE.

Rivalries

Spain has two main rivalries with other top footballing nations.

  • Their rivalry with Italy, sometimes referred to as the Mediterranean Derby, has been contested since 1920, and, although the two nations are not immediate geographical neighbours, their rivalry at international level is enhanced by the strong performances of the representative clubs in UEFA competitions, in which they are among the leading associations and have each enjoyed spells of dominance. Since the quarterfinal match between the two countries at Euro 2008, the rivalry has renewed, with its most notable match between the two sides being in the UEFA Euro 2012 Final, which Spain won 4–0.
  • Their rivalry with Portugal, also known as the Iberian Derby, is one of the oldest football rivalries at a national level. It began on 18 December 1921, when Portugal lost 3–1 to Spain at Madrid in their first ever international friendly game. Portugal lost their first matches, with their first draw (2–2) only coming in 1926. Portugal's first win came much later (4–1) in 1947. Both belong to the strongest football nations of the world, and have met a total of 36 times (of which 9 matches were competitive) which resulted in 18 victories for Spain, 12 draws and 6 victories for Portugal.

Results and fixtures

The following matches were played or are scheduled to be played by the national team in the current or upcoming seasons.

2020

3 September 2020 (2020-09-03) UEFA Nations League Germany  1–1  Spain Stuttgart, Germany
20:45 Werner Goal 51' Report Gayà Goal 90+6' Stadium: Mercedes-Benz Arena
Attendance: 0
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
6 September 2020 (2020-09-06) UEFA Nations League Spain  4–0  Ukraine Madrid, Spain
20:45 Ramos Goal 3' (pen.)29'
Fati Goal 32'
F. Torres Goal 84'
Report Stadium: Alfredo di Stefano Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Benoît Bastien (France)
7 October 2020 Friendly Portugal  0–0  Spain Lisbon, Portugal
19:45 WEST (UTC+1) Report Stadium: Estádio José Alvalade
Attendance: 2,500
Referee: Paolo Valeri (Italy)
10 October 2020 (2020-10-10) UEFA Nations League Spain  1–0   Switzerland Madrid, Spain
20:45 Oyarzabal Goal 14' Report Stadium: Alfredo Di Stefano Stadium
Referee: Ali Palabıyık (Turkey)
13 October 2020 (2020-10-13) UEFA Nations League Ukraine  1–0  Spain Kyiv, Ukraine
20:45 Tsyhankov Goal 76' Report Stadium: Olimpiyskiy National Sports Complex
Referee: Paweł Gil (Poland)
11 November 2020 (2020-11-11) Friendly Netherlands  1–1  Spain Amsterdam, Netherlands
20:45 Van de Beek Goal 47' Report Canales Goal 19' Stadium: Johan Cruyff Arena
Attendance: 0
Referee: Davide Massa (Italy)
14 November 2020 (2020-11-14) UEFA Nations League Switzerland   1–1  Spain Basel, Switzerland
20:45 Freuler Goal 26' Report Gerard Goal 89' Stadium: St. Jakob-Park
Referee: Willie Collum (Scotland)
17 November 2020 (2020-11-17) UEFA Nations League Spain  6–0  Germany Seville, Spain
20:45
Report Stadium: Estadio de La Cartuja
Referee: Andreas Ekberg (Sweden)

2021

25 March 2021 (2021-03-25) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Spain  1–1  Greece Granada, Spain
20:45 CET (UTC+01:00) Morata Goal 33' Report Bakasetas Goal 57' (pen.) Stadium: Nuevo Estadio de Los Cármenes
Referee: Marco Guida (Italy)
28 March 2021 (2021-03-28) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Georgia  1–2  Spain Tbilisi, Georgia
18:00 GET (UTC+04:00) Report
Stadium: Boris Paichadze Dinamo Arena
Referee: Radu Petrescu (Romania)
31 March 2021 (2021-03-31) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Spain  3–1  Kosovo Seville, Spain
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report
Stadium: Estadio de La Cartuja
Referee: Jakob Kehlet (Denmark)
4 June 2021 Friendly Spain  0–0  Portugal Madrid, Spain
19:30 Report Stadium: Wanda Metropolitano
Attendance: 14,743
Referee: Craig Pawson (England)
8 June 2021 (2021-06-08) Friendly Spain  4–0  Lithuania Leganés, Spain
19:45 UTC+1
Report Stadium: Estadio Municipal de Butarque
Referee: Willy Delajod (France)
14 June 2021 (2021-06-14) UEFA Euro 2020 Group E Spain  0–0  Sweden Seville, Spain
21:00 CEST (UTC+02:00) Report Stadium: La Cartuja
Attendance: 10,559
Referee: Slavko Vinčić (Slovenia)
19 June 2021 (2021-06-19) UEFA Euro 2020 Group E Spain  1–1  Poland Seville, Spain
21:00 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report Stadium: Estadio de La Cartuja
Attendance: 11,732
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)
23 June 2021 (2021-06-23) UEFA Euro 2020 Group E Slovakia  0–5  Spain Seville, Spain
18:00 CEST (UTC+02:00) Report
Stadium: Estadio de La Cartuja
Attendance: 11,204
Referee: Björn Kuipers (Netherlands)
28 June 2021 UEFA Euro 2020 R16 Croatia  3–5 (a.e.t.)  Spain Copenhagen, Denmark
18:00 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report
Stadium: Parken Stadium
Attendance: 22,771
Referee: Cüneyt Çakır (Turkey)
6 July 2021 UEFA Euro 2020 SF Italy  1–1 (a.e.t.)
(4–2 p)
 Spain London, England
21:00 CEST (UTC+02:00)
Report
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 57,811
Referee: Felix Brych (Germany)
Penalties
2 September 2021 (2021-09-02) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Sweden  v  Spain Sweden
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00) Report Stadium: Friends Arena
5 September 2021 (2021-09-05) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Spain  v  Georgia Spain
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00) Report Stadium: Nuevo Vivero, Badajoz
8 September 2021 (2021-09-08) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Kosovo  v  Spain Kosovo
20:45 CEST (UTC+02:00) Report Stadium: Fadil Vokrri Stadium
6 October 2021 (2021-10-06) 2021 UEFA Nations League SF Italy  v  Spain Milan, Italy
CEST (UTC+02:00) Report Stadium: San Siro
10 October 2021 (2021-10-10) 3rd/F Spain  v Italy
11 November 2021 (2021-11-11) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Greece  v  Spain Athens
21:45 EET (UTC+02:00) Report Stadium: Olympic Stadium
14 November 2021 (2021-11-14) 2022 FIFA W.C. Q Spain  v  Sweden Spain
20:45 CET (UTC+01:00) Report Stadium: La Cartuja, Seville

Staff

Role Name
Head coach Spain Luis Enrique
Assistant coach Spain Jesús Casas
Goalkeeping coach Spain José Sambade
Fitness coach Spain Rafel Pol
Data analysts Spain Aitor Unzué
Spain Juanjo González
Psychologist Spain Joaquín Valdés
Video analyst Spain Pablo Peña
Doctor Spain Juan José García Cota
Physiotherapists Spain Lorenzo del Pozo
Spain Raúl Martínez
Spain Miguel Gutiérrez
Spain Juan Carlos Herranz
Spain Fernando Galán del Río
Kit men Spain Joaquín Retamosa
Spain José Damián García
Spain Antonio Guerra
Sporting director Spain José Francisco Molina
Team manager Spain Antonio Limones
Delegate Spain Pedro Cortés

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up to the Spain squad for the friendly against Portugal on 4 June 2021 and the UEFA Euro 2020 final tournament. In addition, due to the isolation of some team players following the positive COVID-19 test of Sergio Busquets, a second squad formed by under-21 players was called up for the friendly against Lithuania on 8 June 2021.

Information correct as of 6 July 2021.
No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK David de Gea (1990-11-07) 7 November 1990 (age 30) 45 0 England Manchester United
13 1GK Robert Sánchez (1997-11-18) 18 November 1997 (age 23) 0 0 England Brighton & Hove Albion
23 1GK Unai Simón* (1997-06-11) 11 June 1997 (age 24) 13 0 Spain Athletic Bilbao

2 2DF César Azpilicueta (1989-08-24) 24 August 1989 (age 31) 29 1 England Chelsea
3 2DF Diego Llorente (1993-08-16) 16 August 1993 (age 27) 8 0 England Leeds United
4 2DF Pau Torres* (1997-01-16) 16 January 1997 (age 24) 14 1 Spain Villarreal
12 2DF Eric García* (2001-01-09) 9 January 2001 (age 20) 11 0 Spain Barcelona
14 2DF José Gayà (1995-05-25) 25 May 1995 (age 26) 15 2 Spain Valencia
18 2DF Jordi Alba (vice-captain) (1989-03-21) 21 March 1989 (age 32) 78 8 Spain Barcelona
24 2DF Aymeric Laporte (1994-05-27) 27 May 1994 (age 27) 7 1 England Manchester City

5 3MF Sergio Busquets (captain) (1988-07-16) 16 July 1988 (age 33) 127 2 Spain Barcelona
6 3MF Marcos Llorente (1995-01-30) 30 January 1995 (age 26) 9 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
8 3MF Koke (1992-01-08) 8 January 1992 (age 29) 56 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
10 3MF Thiago (1991-04-11) 11 April 1991 (age 30) 46 2 England Liverpool
16 3MF Rodri (1996-06-22) 22 June 1996 (age 25) 25 1 England Manchester City
17 3MF Fabián (1996-04-03) 3 April 1996 (age 25) 15 1 Italy Napoli
19 3MF Dani Olmo* (1998-05-07) 7 May 1998 (age 23) 16 3 Germany RB Leipzig
22 3MF Pablo Sarabia (1992-05-11) 11 May 1992 (age 29) 9 3 France Paris Saint-Germain
26 3MF Pedri* (2002-11-25) 25 November 2002 (age 18) 10 0 Spain Barcelona

7 4FW Álvaro Morata (1992-10-23) 23 October 1992 (age 28) 46 22 Italy Juventus
9 4FW Gerard (1992-04-07) 7 April 1992 (age 29) 16 5 Spain Villarreal
11 4FW Ferran Torres (2000-02-29) 29 February 2000 (age 21) 17 8 England Manchester City
20 4FW Adama Traoré (1996-01-25) 25 January 1996 (age 25) 6 0 England Wolverhampton Wanderers
21 4FW Mikel Oyarzabal* (1997-04-21) 21 April 1997 (age 24) 19 5 Spain Real Sociedad

Players who were also called up for the 2020 Olympics are marked with asterisk (*).

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team in the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Kepa Arrizabalaga (1994-10-03) 3 October 1994 (age 26) 11 0 England Chelsea UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
GK Álvaro Fernández (1998-04-13) 13 April 1998 (age 23) 1 0 Spain Huesca UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
GK Josep Martínez (1998-05-27) 27 May 1998 (age 23) 1 0 Germany RB Leipzig v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
GK Iñaki Peña (1999-03-02) 2 March 1999 (age 22) 0 0 Spain Barcelona B v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021

DF Raúl Albiol (1985-09-04) 4 September 1985 (age 35) 56 0 Spain Villarreal UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
DF Juan Miranda (2000-01-19) 19 January 2000 (age 21) 1 1 Spain Betis UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
DF Marc Cucurella (1998-07-22) 22 July 1998 (age 23) 1 0 Spain Getafe UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
DF Óscar Mingueza (1999-05-13) 13 May 1999 (age 22) 1 0 Spain Barcelona B UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
DF Alejandro Pozo (1999-02-22) 22 February 1999 (age 22) 1 0 Spain Eibar UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
DF Hugo Guillamón (2000-01-31) 31 January 2000 (age 21) 1 1 Spain Valencia v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
DF Óscar Gil (1998-04-26) 26 April 1998 (age 23) 1 0 Spain Espanyol v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
DF Jorge Cuenca (1999-11-17) 17 November 1999 (age 21) 0 0 Spain Almería v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
DF Sergio Ramos (1986-03-30) 30 March 1986 (age 35) 180 23 France Paris Saint-Germain v.  Kosovo, 31 March 2021
DF Iñigo Martínez (1991-05-17) 17 May 1991 (age 30) 15 0 Spain Athletic Bilbao v.  Kosovo, 31 March 2021
DF Pedro Porro (1999-09-13) 13 September 1999 (age 21) 1 0 Portugal Sporting CP v.  Kosovo, 31 March 2021
DF Sergi Roberto (1992-02-07) 7 February 1992 (age 29) 10 1 Spain Barcelona v.  Germany, 17 November 2020
DF Sergio Reguilón (1996-12-16) 16 December 1996 (age 24) 5 0 England Tottenham Hotspur v.  Germany, 17 November 2020
DF Héctor Bellerín (1995-03-19) 19 March 1995 (age 26) 4 0 England Arsenal v.  Germany, 17 November 2020
DF Jesús Navas (1985-11-21) 21 November 1985 (age 35) 46 5 Spain Sevilla v.  Netherlands, 11 November 2020
DF Dani Carvajal (1992-01-11) 11 January 1992 (age 29) 25 0 Spain Real Madrid v.  Portugal, 7 October 2020 INJ

MF Pablo Fornals (1996-02-22) 22 February 1996 (age 25) 2 0 England West Ham United UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
MF Brais Méndez (1997-01-07) 7 January 1997 (age 24) 1 1 Spain Celta Vigo UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
MF Gonzalo Villar (1998-03-23) 23 March 1998 (age 23) 1 0 Italy Roma UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
MF Martín Zubimendi (1999-02-02) 2 February 1999 (age 22) 1 0 Spain Real Sociedad UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
MF Carlos Soler (1997-01-02) 2 January 1997 (age 24) 0 0 Spain Valencia UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
MF Fran Beltrán (1999-02-03) 3 February 1999 (age 22) 1 0 Spain Celta Vigo v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
MF Antonio Blanco (2000-07-23) 23 July 2000 (age 21) 1 0 Spain Real Madrid Castilla v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
MF Manu García (1998-01-02) 2 January 1998 (age 23) 1 0 Spain Sporting Gijón v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
MF Sergio Canales (1991-02-16) 16 February 1991 (age 30) 10 1 Spain Betis v.  Kosovo, 31 March 2021
MF Marco Asensio (1996-01-21) 21 January 1996 (age 25) 26 1 Spain Real Madrid v.  Germany, 17 November 2020
MF Mikel Merino (1996-06-22) 22 June 1996 (age 25) 6 0 Spain Real Sociedad v.  Germany, 17 November 2020
MF Dani Ceballos (1996-08-07) 7 August 1996 (age 24) 11 1 England Arsenal v.  Ukraine, 13 October 2020
MF José Campaña (1993-05-31) 31 May 1993 (age 28) 1 0 Spain Levante v.  Ukraine, 13 October 2020
MF Óscar (1998-06-28) 28 June 1998 (age 23) 2 0 Spain Sevilla v.  Ukraine, 6 September 2020

FW Rodrigo (1991-03-06) 6 March 1991 (age 30) 25 8 England Leeds United UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
FW Bryan Gil (2001-02-11) 11 February 2001 (age 20) 3 0 England Tottenham Hotspur UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
FW Brahim (1999-08-03) 3 August 1999 (age 21) 1 1 Italy Milan UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
FW Javi Puado (1998-05-25) 25 May 1998 (age 23) 1 1 Spain Espanyol UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
FW Yeremy (2002-10-20) 20 October 2002 (age 18) 0 0 Spain Villarreal UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
FW Abel Ruiz (2000-01-28) 28 January 2000 (age 21) 1 0 Portugal Braga v.  Lithuania, 8 June 2021
FW Ansu Fati (2002-10-31) 31 October 2002 (age 18) 4 1 Spain Barcelona v.  Netherlands, 11 November 2020 INJ

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury
PRE Preliminary squad / standby

Previous squads

Individual records

Player records

Sergio Ramos holds the record for most appearances for the Spanish team with 180 since his debut in 2005. In second place is Iker Casillas with 167, followed by Xavi with 133.

David Villa holds the title of Spain's highest goalscorer, scoring 59 goals from 2005 to 2017, during which time he played for Spain on 98 occasions. Raúl González is the second highest goalscorer, scoring 44 goals in 102 appearances between 1996 and 2006.

Between November 2006 and June 2009, Spain went undefeated for a record-equaling 35 consecutive matches before their loss to the United States in the Confederations Cup, a record shared with Brazil, and included a record 15-game winning streak. In the 2010 FIFA World Cup, Spain became the inaugural European national team to lift the World Cup trophy outside Europe; along with Brazil, Germany and Argentina, Spain is one of the four national teams to have won the FIFA World Cup outside its home continent.

Most capped players

Sergio Ramos holds the record for most appearances in the history of Spain with 180 caps

Below is a list of the ten players with the most caps for Spain, as of 6 July 2021.

Players in bold are still active with Spain.
Rank Player Caps Goals Period
1 Sergio Ramos 180 23 2005–present
2 Iker Casillas 167 0 2000–2016
3 Xavi 133 13 2000–2014
4 Andrés Iniesta 131 13 2006–2018
5 Sergio Busquets 127 2 2009–present
6 Andoni Zubizarreta 126 0 1985–1998
7 David Silva 125 35 2006–2018
8 Xabi Alonso 114 16 2003–2014
9 Cesc Fàbregas 110 15 2006–2016
Fernando Torres 110 38 2003–2014

Top goalscorers

David Villa is the top scorer in the history of Spain with 59 goals

Below is a list of the top ten goalscorers for Spain, as of 6 July 2021.

Rank Player Goals Caps Average Period
1 David Villa (list) 59 98 0.6 2005–2017
2 Raúl (list) 44 102 0.43 1996–2006
3 Fernando Torres (list) 38 110 0.35 2003–2014
4 David Silva 35 125 0.28 2006–2018
5 Fernando Hierro 29 89 0.33 1989–2002
6 Fernando Morientes 27 47 0.57 1998–2007
7 Emilio Butragueño 26 69 0.38 1984–1992
8 Alfredo Di Stéfano 23 31 0.74 1957–1961
Sergio Ramos 23 180 0.13 2005–present
10 Álvaro Morata 22 46 0.48 2014–present
Julio Salinas 22 56 0.39 1986–1996

Captains

Main article: List of Spain national football team captains

List of captaincy periods of the various captains throughout the years.

Manager records

Most manager appearances
Vicente del Bosque: 114

Team records

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

  Champions    Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place  

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 Did not enter Did not enter
Italy 1934 Quarter-finals 5th 3 1 1 1 4 3 2 2 0 0 11 1
France 1938 Withdrew Withdrew
Brazil 1950 Fourth place 4th 6 3 1 2 10 12 2 1 1 0 7 3
Switzerland 1954 Did not qualify 3 1 1 1 6 3
Sweden 1958 4 2 1 1 12 8
Chile 1962 Group stage 13th 3 1 0 2 2 3 4 3 1 0 7 4
England 1966 Group stage 10th 3 1 0 2 4 5 3 2 0 1 5 2
Mexico 1970 Did not qualify 6 2 2 2 10 6
West Germany 1974 5 2 2 1 8 5
Argentina 1978 Group stage 10th 3 1 1 1 2 2 4 3 0 1 4 1
Spain 1982 Second group stage 12th 5 1 2 2 4 5 Qualified as host
Mexico 1986 Quarter-finals 7th 5 3 1 1 11 4 6 4 0 2 9 8
Italy 1990 Round of 16 10th 4 2 1 1 6 4 8 6 1 1 20 3
United States 1994 Quarter-finals 8th 5 2 2 1 10 6 12 8 3 1 27 4
France 1998 Group stage 17th 3 1 1 1 8 4 10 8 2 0 26 6
South Korea Japan 2002 Quarter-finals 5th 5 3 2 0 10 5 8 6 2 0 21 4
Germany 2006 Round of 16 9th 4 3 0 1 9 4 12 6 6 0 25 5
South Africa 2010 Champions 1st 7 6 0 1 8 2 10 10 0 0 28 5
Brazil 2014 Group stage 23rd 3 1 0 2 4 7 8 6 2 0 14 3
Russia 2018 Round of 16 10th 4 1 3 0 7 6 10 9 1 0 36 3
Qatar 2022 To be determined 3 2 1 0 6 3
Canada Mexico United States 2026 To be determined
Total 1 title 15/21 63 30 15 18 99 72 120 83 26 11 282 77
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Gold background colour indicates that the tournament was won.
***Red border colour indicates tournament was held on home soil.

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualification record
Year Result Position Pld W D* L GF GA Pld W D* L GF GA
France 1960 Did not qualify 2 2 0 0 7 2
Spain 1964 Champions 1st 2 2 0 0 4 2 6 4 1 1 16 5
Italy 1968 Did not qualify 8 3 2 3 7 5
Belgium 1972 6 3 2 1 14 3
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 8 3 4 1 11 9
Italy 1980 Group stage 7th 3 0 1 2 2 4 6 4 1 1 13 5
France 1984 Runners-up 2nd 5 1 3 1 4 5 8 6 1 1 24 8
West Germany 1988 Group stage 6th 3 1 0 2 3 5 6 5 0 1 14 6
Sweden 1992 Did not qualify 7 3 0 4 17 12
England 1996 Quarter-finals 6th 4 1 3 0 4 3 10 8 2 0 25 4
Belgium Netherlands 2000 Quarter-finals 5th 4 2 0 2 7 7 8 7 0 1 42 5
Portugal 2004 Group stage 10th 3 1 1 1 2 2 10 7 2 1 21 5
Austria Switzerland 2008 Champions 1st 6 5 1 0 12 3 12 9 1 2 23 8
Poland Ukraine 2012 Champions 1st 6 4 2 0 12 1 8 8 0 0 26 6
France 2016 Round of 16 10th 4 2 0 2 5 4 10 9 0 1 23 3
European Union 2020 Semi-finals 3rd 6 2 4 0 13 6 10 8 2 0 31 5
Germany 2024 To be determined To be determined
Total 3 titles 11/16 46 21 15 10 68 42 125 89 18 18 314 91

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
Year Division Group Pld W D L GF GA P/R Rank
Portugal 2018–19 A 4 4 2 0 2 12 7 Same position 7th
Italy 2020–21 A 4 6 3 2 1 13 3 Same position TBD
2022–23 A To be determined
Total 10 5 2 3 25 10 7th

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA Squad
Saudi Arabia 1992 UEFA did not participate
Saudi Arabia 1995 Did not qualify
Saudi Arabia 1997
Mexico 1999
South Korea Japan 2001
France 2003
Germany 2005
South Africa 2009 Third place 3rd 5 4 0 1 11 4 Squad
Brazil 2013 Runners-up 2nd 5 3 1 1 15 4 Squad
Russia 2017 Did not qualify
Total Runners-up 2/10 10 7 1 2 26 8

Olympic Games

Olympic Games record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
Belgium 1920 Silver medalists 2nd 5 4 0 1 9 5
France 1924 Round 1 17th 1 0 0 1 0 1
Netherlands 1928 Quarter-finals 6th 3 1 1 1 9 9
Germany 1936 Withdrew
United Kingdom 1948 Did not qualify
Finland 1952
Australia 1956
Italy 1960
Japan 1964
19681988 See Spain national amateur football team
Since 1992 See Spain national under-23 football team
Total 1 Silver Medal 3/9 9 5 1 3 18 15
  • Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Mediterranean Games

Mediterranean Games record
Year Round Position Pld W D* L GF GA
Egypt 1951 Did not qualify
19551967 See Spain national amateur football team
Turkey 1971 Did not enter
Algeria 1975
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1979
Morocco 1983
Syria 1987
Since 1991 See Spain national under-23 football team or Spain national under-20 football team
or Spain national under-18 football team

Source:

Head-to-head record

All-time results

The following table shows Spain's all-time international record, correct as of 14 June 2021.

Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA
Total 716 418 166 132 1434 643

FIFA Rankings

Last update was on 28 November 2019. Source:

Honours

Competition 1st place, gold medalist(s) 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Total
World Cup 1 0 0 1
European Championship 3 1 1 5
Olympic Games 1 2 0 3
Confederations Cup 0 1 1 2
Nations League 0 0 0 0
Total 5 4 2 11

See also

Notes

External links